Month: June 2015

Hate Isn’t Helpful

LeadToday

So…. I sent out a tweet a few days ago about hate. It said basically that you don’t gain anything by hating and that the “hater” loses more than the “hated.” That’s it, it didn’t say anything about who hated, why anyone would hate, it mentioned no name, no race, no sexual preference, no political affiliations, nothing.

Immediately after sending it out, and I mean immediately, I started getting replies about how stupid liberal democrats are and how republicans make it hard not to hate. In short, I received a bunch of hate-filled replies agreeing that hate was terrible but blaming either democrats or republicans for making it impossible not to hate.

I’m going to guess here but I’m betting it was Republicans blaming Democrats and Democrats blaming Republicans.

Other people blamed gays for hate, or Muslims, or TV news, or cops, or blacks, or whites, it went on and…

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Stout Canyon Road, Duck Creek Utah Area

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Every now and then I get to spend time in the Duck Creek Village, Utah area.  Of course, when I’m there I try and find interesting places to run.  On my last trip I ran Stout Canyon Road (Forest 063).  This is a nice 9 mile forest service road, generally down hill From UTAH-14 to US-89.

Towards the beginning of the course you will run through forest impacted by the 2012 Shingle Fire.  The area is partially regrown and not ugly, though you have to appreciate the fire damage for what it is.

After that you run through typical Utah forest and eventually into sparse cabin property.  A nice 18 mile round trip.

  • Non Technical
  • gradual incline/decline
  • No cell-service
  • very little traffic
  • Can be muddy
  • No big payoff, though you do get a nice view of the red rocks.

Ed

Home Roasting and Lean Manufacturing

Roaster

On my recent tour of commercial roasters I had fun looking at their manufacturing and warehousing processes.  I like warehousing and manufacturing.  I don’t work in that industry, but I like all the processes: cool conveyor belts and forklifts and all sorts of activity.  Whats not to love?  And when its a coffee warehouse, roaster, and manufacturer just about everything I find cool is located in one place.

The roasters i toured were operating on purpose.  I’m not sure if they are formally Lean or Six Sigma or some other ‘plan’, but they are operating with thought and purpose behind their activities.  Here are some points of Lean, commercial roasting, and how the points may impact home roasting:

  • Chaff is recyclable organic material.  When I sweep my chaff into the lawn, I’m not being lazy.  I’m recycling.
  • Lean puts a lot of emphasis on ergonomics.  How ergonomic is your roasting set up and can you improve it?
  • Blend strategy impacts inventory.  You should chose your blend strategy based on flavor, but if you blend before roasting you won’t need to maintain blend stock.
    • I’m not blending but it was neat to observe that commercial operators approach blending with different strategies.
  • Consistancy.  Lean and Six Sigma want to measure and eliminate varation.  Roasters measure and track varations in their roast.  I wonder if I need to measure and track my finished products.
    • I’ve tried to use a roast log but I didn’t really know how I was going to use it.  I wonder if I can switch from a roasters log to a tasters type of log.  Track the finished level of roast and the finished taste.
  • Green storage is interesting.  Even if you are buying container loads, greens are transported and stored in 150 lb jute bags.  It seems that there are a lot of non-value added steps in this process.
  • Disaster plans: Both roasters had contigencies for disasters.  My backup plan for beans is to run down to starbucks  🙂

Ed